Resurrection

by John Donne

Moist, with one drop of thy blood, my dry soule
Shall (though she now be in extreme degreeToo stony hard, and yet too fleshly) be
Freed by that drop, from being starved, hard, or foul,
And life, by this death abled, shall control
Death, whom thy death slew; nor shall to me
Fear of first or last death, bring misery,
If in thy little book my name thou enroll,
Flesh in that long sleep is not putrified,
But made that there, of which, and for which ’twas;
Nor can by other means be glorified.
May then sins sleep, and deaths soon from me pass,
That waked from both, I again risen may
Salute the last, and everlasting day.

Good-Friday, 1613, Riding Westward.

by John Donne

LET man’s soul be a sphere, and then, in this,
Th’ intelligence that moves, devotion is ;
And as the other spheres, by being grown
Subject to foreign motion, lose their own,
And being by others hurried every day,
Scarce in a year their natural form obey ;
Pleasure or business, so, our souls admit
For their first mover, and are whirl’d by it.
Hence is’t, that I am carried towards the west,
This day, when my soul’s form bends to the East.
There I should see a Sun by rising set,
And by that setting endless day beget.
But that Christ on His cross did rise and fall,
Sin had eternally benighted all. Continue reading

On the Use of “Gnostic”

I don’t want to always be a schoolmarm, correcting the misuse of this or that term, but there are a few that cry out for attention.  “Gnostic” is one such word.  It has recently come to be a shorthand to describe a variety of concepts, typically those which prioritize the spirit or the mind to the body.  Anyone who believes in the priority of the intellect could be called a “Gnostic” under this usage, as well as anyone who thinks that the soul is on a different plane of being than the body.  “Gnostic” is also employed to critique those who hold to idealism over materialism.  Strangely, not a few of the modern “anti-Gnostics” have gone so far as to deny the soul’s ability to exist apart from the body, thus creating a heresy of their own in the opposite direction.

But according to folks like Kurt Rudolph, we don’t actually know much about the original Gnostics. Continue reading

Inescapability of Philosophy

Thinking about the gay caveman and the media attention given to it, I’m left with a few thoughts.

It is currently the case that “science” and to a lesser extent “history” are the leading intellectual pressure-points.  If science can speak to us, then we are to listen and obey.  If history teaches us, then we must react to it in a politically appropriate way.  But here’s the reality- science and history are both methods of observation.

Science answers the question “What is this?”  History answers the question “What was this?”  But neither can answer the question “What does this mean?”  Neither can answer the question “What should we do about this?”

And those last two questions are what most folks seem to be interested in.  That’s when philosophy steps in.